Click to enlargeJ2/P2

The famous silver centered cent without the silver cent. This was struck in copper and/or billon, the latter often referred to as fusible alloy. Judd describes these as having obliquely reeded edges but all the examples I have seen have normal vertical reeding.

The following examples are known:

1) Smithsonian - Unc. This is also the Judd 1st-7th edition and Adams & Woodin plate coin

2) Parmelee (New York Coin and Stamp, 6/1890), Steigerwalt, Brand, Norweb-B/M 11/1988, A. Weinberg - XF, illustrated above

3) Wolcott family-I&L Goldberg 2/2005, Heritage 1/2008, Simpson Collection - PCGSVF30, illustrated below



4) Seavey (Descriptive Catalog-William Strobridge, 6/1873), Parmelee, Maris-H.P. Smith, 6/1886, Garrett-JHU, Garrett IV-B/R 3/1981, Partrick - VF

5) Lauder-Doyle Galleries 12/1983, Benson-I&L Goldberg, 2/2001, ANR 8/2006, Southern Collection, Simpson Collection, Heritage 1/12 - NGCF15

6) Paramount 4/1965, Pine Tree Auctions 2/1975, ANA Museum - good

7) Harmer-Rooke 11/1969; Anton collection - good.

8) Lohr FPL, River Oaks-B/R 1176, Stacks 1/87, StacksBowers 2013 ANA - PCGS genuine net good

9) Fewsmith-Mason & Co. 10/1870, Appleton-MHS, but not there now

Saul Teichman has discovered, since confirmed by Alan Weinberg and John Dannreuther that the Higgy-Boyd ANS-1956.163.25 example which shows a cracked obverse die and a plain edge, was struck or cast from copy dies using the Norweb coin as a host.

Note: The genuineness of specimens 5-8 has been questioned. #8 was returned to Stack's after the 1987 sale.

Over a dozen examples are known of J1/P1 with the silver center with the Gschwend-Ellsworth-Garrett and Brock-Univ of Penn-Norweb coins, both uncirculated, being the two finest.

There is also a recently discovered example, probably the finest known of all of these, which was struck without the silver plug in it resulting in the coin having a small hole in the middle. It was offered as lot 1400 in Stacks 3/95 sale. We have not assigned it a separate Judd or Pollock number as we are not sure if this was deliberate or some kind of mint error in the production of the J1/P1.

For additional historical information on 1792 coinage, click here.

Photos courtesy of Alan Weinberg and Ira & Larry Goldberg's Coins and Collectibles.