Click to enlargeJ127/P149

The ring cent of 1851, a continuation of the work performed in 1850. Per Pollock, these were made in response to a Congressman Sam F. Vinton of the House Ways and Means Committee's bill drafted in 1849 to reduce the size of the one cent piece.

Examples were made in the following combinations:

Billon with central perforation and plain edge J127 & J127A/P149 These are the original issue although restrikes are also believed to exist.

Billon without central perforation and reeded edge J128A/P150 These are believed to be restrikes. Less than a half dozen are known.

Billon without central perforation and plain edge J128/P151 These are believed to be restrikes. Less than a half dozen are known.

Silver without central perforation and reeded edge J128B/P152 Three examples have been confirmed including the Auction 84, Bowers and Merena 8/95 and Heritage 6/17 sales. It is believed that these are restrikes struck on dime planchets.

Note: The Lohr fixed price list offered a perforated silver example which has not since been traced.

Copper with central perforation and plain edge J129/P153 Both originals and restrikes are believed to have been struck. Some of these may have been pickled or silver-plated at the mint. About a dozen are believed known.

Copper without central perforation and plain edge J130/P154 These are believed to be restrikes. About a half dozen are known including the illustrated example below.

Photo courtesy of Bowers and Merena.

Copper-nickel without central perforation and reeded edge J131/P155 These are restrikes. About a half dozen are known.

Nickel without central perforation and reeded edge J131A/P156 These are restrikes which are similar to standard coin nickel. Fewer than a half dozen are known.

Photo courtesy of Superior.