Click to enlargeJ119/P134

The ring cent of 1850. Per Pollock, these were made in response to a Congressman Sam F. Vinton of the House Ways and Means Committee's bill drafted in 1849 to reduce the size of the one cent piece. A notation in George Eckfeld's journal state that "first cent struck in March 13th 1850".

Examples were made in the following combinations:

Billon with central perforation J119/P134 These are the original issue. It is unclear if the examples struck from the broken state of the dies are originals or later restrikes. To see the die breaks, simply click on the thumbnail image to enlarge or at the image of the unperforated example below.

Billon without central perforation J120/P135 These are believed to be restrikes from the broken state of the dies as shown below. Less than a dozen are known.



Copper with central perforation J121/P136 Both originals and restrikes are believed to have been struck and exist struck from both the perfect and broken state of the dies. Some of these may have been pickled or silver-plated at the mint. Over a dozen are believed known.

Copper without central perforation J122/P137 These are restrikes from the broken state of the dies. Very few are known.

Copper-nickel with central perforation J123/P138 These are restrikes from the broken state of the dies. About a half dozen are known.

Copper-nickel without central perforation J124/P139 These are restrikes from the broken state of the dies. About a half dozen are known.

Photos courtesy of American Numismatic Rarities.